Archive for ‘Expeditions’

Sail Rock trip January 2016

By , 5 February, 2016, No Comment

Sail Rock (aka “Hin Bai”) is one of the top diving destinations in the Gulf of Thailand, it has great visibility with large groups of schooling fish, as well as some of the most spectacular underwater scenery.

 

sail rock mapAfter a leisurely 1 hour  and half cruise from Sairee Beach, Koh Tao, the Davy Jones Locker boat arrives at this truly exciting and extensive dive site. The main structure actually sticks out of the water and the rest of the features are below – Sail Rock’s exposed position makes it a focal point for all the marine life around – stopping to take a break or to visit a cleaning station.

Sail Rock is a deeper dive site and there can be some currents, but by diving in small groups with personal care and attention it’s usually safe for all.

 

sail rock dive siteColourful cup corals, giant black coral, white eyed morays and raggy scorpionfish are just some of the highlights of the non-pelagic life on the pinnacle. Outside, look out for big schools of fish, particularly jack, barracuda, snapper and batfish, plus hunting king and queenfish and more.

 

Sail Rock trip January 2016The awesome scenery as the visibility increases is something to be experienced, and there’s even a small vertical chimney for adventurous divers to swim through. You may also be lucky enough to see a whale shark as they occasionally visit the site, but they are not guaranteed!

 

 

 

7. Instructor patricia driving the boatPatricia

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“Top Night Out”

By , 1 June, 2015, No Comment

It has been recently brought to my attention that even the most experienced, brightest and most beautiful divers in the world are still unsure regarding “Night Diving” So this months “Dicks Top Tips” shall become a “Knight” in shining Scuba gear and look into what can really make it a “Top Night Out

1) Stay close and shallow. Night dives tend to be shallow, so you’ll have plenty of bottom time to go slow and take it all in. Colours, for example, are much more vivid on a night dive than they are during the day, on a night dive, your light source is in normally in your hands, so the water doesn’t take away any of the light unlike when you are 18 metres under.

2) Secure you light. Most dive lights come with a way to attach a lanyard or wrist strap. Get one. It’s cheap insurance against dropping and losing your main source of illumination. Most dive lights will sink like a rock, if you drop one in deep water it may be gone forever.

3) Go “easy” on the light. First-time night divers tend to buy the biggest, brightest beam they can find and cling to it like a security blanket. As you gain experience diving at night and get comfortable, you’ll find smaller lights work just as well. On some night dives, lights of other divers, the boat and the moon can provide as much ambient light you will think its the middle of the day!

4) Get the right gear. You’ll need a main dive light and a backup light. The main light should be the larger and brighter of the two. How large and how bright? That’s up to you, and your choice may vary depending on how clear the water is. When shopping for a light, try out several as some have different grips and handles to suit your personal preferences. Your backup – or pocket – light should be small enough to stow easily, yet bright enough to help you find your way back home.

5) Have fun! Most important, relax and enjoy the dive. It’s natural to be a little anxious before stepping in the dark void of an unlit ocean, but it’s also exciting. When you overcome your anxieties about night diving, you will get to see a completely different side of the dive site, with 10 times as much life as you have seen before!

For help on choosing the best torch for you, or to maybe book a night dive pop into the shop at Davy Jones Locker Koh Tao and speak to one of their Awesome Instructors. Or visit www.davyjoneslocker.asia for all your dive needs!!!

Don’t Worry Dive Happy!!

And rememeber the all inportant rule number two of Scuba Diving……….

Always Look Cool!

richKnight-Diving

 

 

 

 

 

By Rich

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How I can improve my diving

By , 30 May, 2015, No Comment

As an instructor here at DJL I am always looking at how I can improve my diving, I can then transfer these skills into my teaching and hopefully make my students all round better divers.

Soon after deciding to become a professional diver, I began to think about technical diving and how it could improve my skills and provide another exciting element to my diving. After months of research into this area of diving I finally got the opportunity to partake in multiple tech courses at DJL with our very talented and knowledgeable resident tech instructor David Polley, and I loved every minute!

Here at DJL we have multiple options available for you to move into the world of technical diving; so you can go deeper, see new things and just generally improve your knowledge and skills as a diver.

So if you want to take that next step in your diving career, contact us at the shop and we can discuss all options available to you.

Next month I will talk more about the skills you will learn as a technical diver.

Matt aka ‘Trim-Master-Flash’

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By Matt

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Why Go Pro?….

By , 27 May, 2015, No Comment

Why Go Pro?…

How many people can truly wake up every morning and say i love my job? i can guarantee that i think this every morning. in my opinion there isn’t much better out there than getting to take people of all different varieties diving, and helping them learn how to experience the underwater world.

There are many different reasons that led me to my career as a dive instructor with Davy Jones Locker Koh tao, but it was definitely one of the best decisions i have ever made. As a PADI professional i am lucky to be a part of the most widely recognized SCUBA training organisations on the planet. I have met many students who have come to Koh Tao for a dive course or even just some fun dives and who have got hooked instantly, and lets be honest its not a bad thing to get hooked on. As an instructor at Davy Jones’ Locker i get to work with a fantastic bunch of girls and guys from all different walks of life and we all have the wonderful opportunity of living on one of the most beautiful islands in the world (my humble opinion). Not only is the lifestyle amazing but i also get to show students and fellow divers some of the most diverse underwater life around.  so i urge you to consider taking the leap if you have a passion for the underwater world, the Divemaster and IDC programmes at Davy jones’ locker could just take you out of the real world and into our crazy underwater bubble, where your office and computer are replaced by sun sea and all the fun that goes with it.

By Dani

dani

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Caring for your Equipment

By , 24 May, 2015, No Comment

As anyone that has got seriously into diving and bought the full gear, it is not the cheapest sport to get into. But how do you maintain it in all it’s pristine glory, without having to resort to using shop gear whilst you wait for your regs to be repaired?

There are a few tricks of the trade that you can use that will prolong the life of your equipment saving you a few precious pennies, which can be put towards your next dive holiday!

General advice

One of the first things you are taught on the Open Water course is to rinse all your gear off with fresh water after your day’s diving is done. By doing this you are removing all sand, salt and chlorine, which are corrosive and will start to destroy your kit, particularly if you won’t be using it for a while afterwards. Another good idea is to dry all kit properly before it is stored away to prevent any mold growing. Nothing is more devastating that getting your kit out of the attic (loft) only to find that it’s now covered in mold!

Regulators

By pressing the purge valve whenever you open your tank, this will extend the life of the HP seat within the first stage of the regulator. Once this wears away you will start to notice a small free flow from either of the regulators, and it is time to get it changed.

Tank

Whenever you turn a tank on, turn the valve slowly to avoid particles hitting closed valves at high speeds which can be sources of ignition (think KABOOM!) Also keep your tank out of the sun and have it visually inspected every year, as well as servicing the tank valve. Whenever you have tanks stood around avoid leaving them in direct sunlight for prolonged periods. Tank pressure will increase/decrease by 1 bar for every degree of temperature change.

 

So there you have it. By looking after your equipment it will last longer, and you won’t get into any nasty situations underwater with malfunctioning kit! At Davy Jones Locker in Koh Tao we have Shop Ops course, which will teach you more about servicing your own kit, which will save you a bit of money and also give you opportunity to earn some extra cash by doing it for others!

chris n picture

Caring for your Equipment

By Chris N.

 

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