Archive for ‘Koh Lipe’

SEA SNAKES

By , 4 May, 2015, No Comment

Although all snakes can swim, sea snakes live mostly in the water.  They do need to come up for air but can stay under water for up to an hour! Since they need air regularly they are usually found in shallow waters of the Indian Ocean, and warmer areas of the Pacific Ocean.  They eat fish, fish eggs and eels that they find under rocks and in reefs.

There are about 30-50 different types of sea snakes and they belong to the Cobra family.  The average Sea snake grows to about 2 meters long and has a smallish head for its body size.  Their tails are flattened to make fast swimming possible and flaps over their nostrils close when they are underwater.

Sea snakes are very poisonous. Fortunately, these snakes have short fangs and they are unable to bite through diver’s suits very easily.  They are not likely to bite unless threatened.

Eels are sometimes mistaken for Sea Snakes. Eels are part of the fish family and have gills for breathing.  Sea snakes do not have gills but lungs instead and need to go to the surface for air.

Sea Kraits are one of the few sea snakes that go to land to lay their eggs while most others, like the Olive sea snake will give birth in the water. snake                                         Sea snakes do not have gills but lungs instead and need to go to the surface for air.

By Sophie

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Going up in the world

By , 2 May, 2014, No Comment

If you are an experienced instructor looking for a new challenge, why not upgrade your qualifications with DJL’s IDC staff instructor course.  PADI IDC staff instructors are in demand diving professionals with the skills and experience to hold more senior position within the industry.

I recently attended the IDC staff Instructor course at Davy Jones Locker Diving on Koh Tao in Thailand and found it to be a really interesting and valuable experience, working with DJL’s team of outstanding course directors and staff instructors as they conduct the PADI Instructor development course.  DJL offer ICD’s in English, French, Dutch, Spanish and Korean so on a DJL IDC you get to meet interesting people from all around the world and make contacts that will be helpful throughout your diving career.

The aims of the IDC Staff course are to improve all your areas of diving theory knowledge and PADI standards to a level where you are able to help with the development of the next generation of PADI instructors.  You learn how to mark and give feedback on all areas of the IDC including confined, open water and classroom presentations.  Seasoned instructors will love the ability to pass on their experience and knowledge to trainee instructors as they take their first steps towards building themselves a future in this amazing industry.

Take the next step today and contact DJL to arrange your IDC staff instructor course today, do it now, you will never look back.

 

Ed

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Size Doesn’t Matter

By , 10 October, 2013, No Comment

Here in Koh Tao we have a plethora of different aquatic species of all different shapes and sizes. Everyone wants to see Whale sharks and Bull-sharks, and who can blame them, they are both majestic creatures; however, there are some of the smaller species which I think are still exciting to find and awesome in their colour and movement. Here are three of my favourite:

Clown Trigger Fish (Balistoides conspicillum – if you’re interested in its Latin name) – A couple of months ago while diving on the wreck I spotted my first clown trigger and wow, it stopped me in my tracks. Compared to the more common titan and yellow margin triggerfish this is much smaller in size, growing up to only around 50cm. Its main background colour is black, but its underside is covered in large white spots and the area around its dorsal fin is an almost leopard-like pattern. The small mouth has a ring of yellow around it and just blow its eyes there is a band of white which gives the trigger the appearance of wearing a black mask.

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Juvenile Harlequin Sweetlips – I often see these around Hin Wong Bay and they amaze me with their movement. They are quite small in size, around 2-3inches, and swim with their head pointed down and with a very exaggerated fin movement, mimicking the movement of nudibranch or flatworm which helps to keep predators away. As they get older their colour changes from brown with white with large white dots and white-and-black fins, to white with brown spots on the body and fins. They are great fun to watch and can be quite mesmerizing.

Hin Wong Bay

Yellow Box Fish – There is a little yellow box fish at Hin Pee Wee who hides in the tall pinnacle to the east of the main pinnacle. They are funny to watch, almost the cartoon character of the fish world with their cubelike body. As an adult it reaches a maximum length of 45 centimetres, but when juvenile, it is only around 3-4 inches in length and bright yellow in color with navy spots all over it. As it ages, the brightness fades and very old specimens will have blue-grey coloration with faded yellow. As a little bit of useless information, in 2006, Mercedes unveiled its ‘Bionic concept car’, which was actually inspired by the shape of the yellow boxfish.

yellow_boxfish

by Jo

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Better Air

By , 7 October, 2013, No Comment

At Davy Jones Locker, Koh Tao, we have recently upgraded our compressor system.  In addition to our existing Coltri Sub MCH 16 compressor we now have a new Bauer Poseidon compressor.  This increases the speed we can pump air fills to 400 liters per minute.  We also have a new Bauer B-Kool unit, this is designed to add a second stage of cooling and drying to the air we compress.  Breathing grade air is required to pass through a filter cartridge, which contains special granules to clean and dry the air.  This prevents bad tastes, smells, oil and water from entering your scuba cylinder.  With the B-Kool unit the filter performance is improved by seven times.  After filtration the air is now deliver to our new five way manifold allowing us to fill up to 5 tanks at the same time.

 Ed

b-kool_standalone

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Great Diving on Koh Tao!!

By , 20 September, 2013, No Comment

Been a good couple of weeks here on Koh Tao, lots of new and experienced divers visiting the island, some here to start diving and many taking their diving to the next level.
We have also had a lot see in the water which is always great! Turtles definitely seem to be showing up more. I’ve seen 3 in the past 2weeks, all at different sites and doing different activities. Saw a small hawksbill turtle swimming towards the beach over the sand-patch at Mango Bay on an open water course, a green turtle going to bed at White Rock doing a night adventure dive and another hawksbill (maybe the same one from Mango Bay) at Red Rock on the way back to Japanese Gardens… glad to see them around, especially as we’re on Turtle Island!
It’s not just the turtles that are around, we’ve also seen sea-snakes and a couple whale sharks have been seen at Chumpon… first ones in a while!
Now all I need to do as soon as possible is head down to Koh Lipe to do some of the spectacular diving that’s on offer down there, really looking forward to it as the season gets on underway there.vlcsnap-2011-11-22-00h42m52s0

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